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MASELLO MOTANA’S VOCAL MUSEUM

Live at the Chimurenga Factory

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CHIMURENGA@20: STICKFIGHTING DAYS

Everyone knows I’m a two-stick man. But, I’m not ready to go up against Markham again just yet. Or any of the other top stickfighters. I’ve been trying some new moves. I feel close to a breakthrough in terms of technique. But it’s not quite there

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IN MEMORIAM: OMOSEYE BOLAJI (1964-2022)

We remember Nigerian-born writer, Omoseye Bolaji (1964-2022), and his immense contribution to the growth of African literature in South Africa, and particularly in the Free State, where he lived.

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Chimurenganyana: You Look Illegal by Paula Ihozo Akugizibwe (Feb 2022)

“I know that even if angry hordes decided to descend on these neighbourhoods dominated by settlers with generational wealth—to tell them that they, too, should go back to where they came from—they would be shut down so rapidly, so ruthlessly, that it would leave us all breathless. There is no problem for foreigners like you. The hotel receptionist was more right than wrong, because proximity to whiteness offers protections. Unless what you need protection from is whiteness itself.”

Paula Akugizibwe’s essay draws its title from a deeply unsettling encounter with the South African police on the streets of Cape Town in early 2008 – a year etched in public memory by the images of Ernesto Alfabeto Nhamuave, a Mozambican national, burning in full view of the residents of Ramaphosa Park in the east of Johannesburg, and by the wide-spread violence directed at other Africans who live here. Akugizibwe’s dark skin marks her out as a person who in their eyes is ‘illegal’, undesirable; a body that can be violated without consequence.

The encounter with the police, and the insult hurled at her, provide the spark for Akugizibwe’s mediation on skin, violence, and the limits of citizenship in a country where black lives have long been brutally (mis)handled.

Cover photograph: Six Seconds by Alfredo Jaar


A limited Chimurenganyana edition of You Look Illegal is available in print at the Chimurenga Factory, or from our our online store

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Chimurenganyana: The Fear and Loathing Out of Harare by Dambudzo Marechera (Dec 2021)

by Dambudzo Marechera

“I formed the Harare eye: not just the Harare of the African flats or the Harare of the hotel bars or the shebeens and the kachasu drinkers or the high-density areas. For me the only way to express this Harare is to experiment with all available literary styles and perhaps come to a successful combination. There is no particular Harare psyche or mentality.”

During April 1985 Dambudzo Marechera began work on a book on Harare, inspired in part by the HS Thompson’s gonzo opus on Las Vegas. Writing that shows how the city held him in precarious balance, homeless at home, a black insider on the outside of the outside. At some point he abandoned the project and the pieces lived in the archives, unloved.

The Fear and Loathing Out of Harare is a selection of these never-published essays, in collaboration with the Dambudzo Marechera Trust, with an afterword by writer Tinashe Mushakavanhu and a map-poster of Marechera’s Harare conceived by the Black Chalk & Co collective.


A limited Chimurenganyana edition of The Fear and Loathing Out of Harare is available in print at the Chimurenga Factory, or from our our online store

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Chimurenganyana: Home Is Where The Music Is by Uhuru Phalafala (September 2021)

“Home is where the music is” is drawn from Keorapetse Kgositsile’s poem “For Hughie Masekela”, dedicated to the South African trumpeter, composer and bandleader. The poem ends with the lines, “This then is the rhythm / and the blues of it / Home is where the music is”. The poem was published in the 1974 collection, The Present Is A Dangerous Place To Live, however it was presented to Masekela earlier. Bra Hugh then recorded a double album titled Home Is Where The Music Is, with artwork by South African abstract expressionist Dumile Feni, released in 1972. The album features the song, “Blues for Huey”, which evokes the lamentation and longing of exile in Kgositsile’s poem, interweaving New York and Maseru, revealing continuities across the Atlantic.

As soundtrack to the writing, Uhuru assembled a sonic documentary, which can be listened to here:

[for track info and credits, check in here]

A limited Chimurenganyana edition of Home Is Where The Music Is is available in print at the Chimurenga Factory, or from our our online store.

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PASS LANDING AT LAVOIR MODERNE PARISIEN, PARIS

From 5-9 May 2021, Chimurenga’s Pan African Space Station (PASS) landed at Lavoir Moderne Parisien in Goutte d’or, Paris, to imagine, re-examine and re-circulate sonic archives of black radicalism in the francophone world. This session dug into the “soundtrack” (bande-son), an underlying container of information and ideas that is seldom explored on its own terms.

We departed from cinematic practice, specifically films/filmmakers (Julius-Amedee Laou, Elsie Haas, Med Hondo, Kanor sisters, Sarah Maldoror, etc) represented in the printed archive we had recently installed in Centre Pompidou, and expanded the soundtrack beyond the screen to other areas of knowledge production: the street, the club, recording studios, kongossa, live performances, noise, even the magazine page.

We imagined a live in-studio soundtrack that responded to and expanded visual footage from the 2nd Congress of Black Writers and Artists in Rome 1959 – an event charged by the-then process of decolonisation and the unwelcome presence of younger, radical thinkers such as Fanon, Beti, Glissant, Beville and more. We took the cues from Fabienne and Véronique Kanor’s “La noiraude” to explore zouk as aesthetics of black transnationalism – a geography of unauthorised pleasure throughout the 1980s. We listened to Sarah Maldoror’s record collection, and her use of music on film.

In Julius-Amedee Laou’s “Solitaire a micro ouvert”, the brother of a man killed in a racist murder in Paris of the 1980s takes over of a black radio station to address the “community”. In “La Vieille Quimboiseuse et le majordome” he highlights the dialectic between the seen and the heard. We listened to the oral history of “La coordination des femmes noires” that writer Gerty Dambury continually produces; or Gerard Lockel’s development of gro ka moden as decolonial praxis; or the Paris-based afro/astrosonic network documented in the music Jo Maka, Ramadolf, Cheikh Tidiane Fall, Yebga Likoba and more, which not only connects directly to Maldoror’s film “Un dessert pour Constance” but also puts sound to the immigrant struggles of the post-May 68 era. And brought us to the ongoing gentrification and structural violence in Goutte d’or.

We considered Frank Biyong’s retelling of the war of decolonisation in Cameroun in his album “Ibolo Ini”, and more broadly his use of music as site of memorialising; and explored black ecologies through sound.

We presented “Act 2” of Christian Nyampeta’s acclaimed radio-play “The Africans”.

And live performances, talks, screenings, DJ sets. And more.

Recorded sessions from the landing are available for replay via PASS on Mixcloud.

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Chimurenganyana: Even When My Soup-curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take by Georgia Anne Muldrow (June 2021)

Georgia arrives in the middle of a song. She multiplies there to become singer, instrumentalist, poet, producer, her very presence is lyrical and elides fixed meaning and form. What orbits her work, at the risk of becoming jaded and delirious while circling her innate rhythm in a land that tries to contain its reach, is optimism. Her sound is often that of someone dejected by her own optimism, as if it betrays her reality or turns some purposed doom to triumph before it can strike. Do you ever check on your well adjusted, optimistic friends, the ones who always make you feel a little better just from being around them for a few hours? Those who give the most and make it seem effortless are often the most neglected. Their shadows become weapons of potential self-sabotage because no one notices that umbra looming beneath so much shine and defiance. Here we get to bask in such a shadow as if we have earned access to the part of the music that will never be on the market, that refuses the transactional, that confesses ahead of the beat, unmarks the beast, achieves true self-actualization.

(from the preface by Harmony Holiday)

Also featuring drawings by Yaoundé Olu.


A limited Chimurenganyana edition of Even When My Soup-Curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take is available in print at the Chimurenga Factory, or from our our online store.

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IMAGI-NATION NWAR (APRIL 2021)

imagi-nation nwar – genealogies of the black radical imagination in the francophone world

de-composed, an-arranged and re-produced by Chimurenga

feat. Mongo Beti & Odile Biyidi’s Peuples Noirs, Peuples Africains; Elsie Haas, Julius-Amédée Laou; Cheikh Anta Diop; FEANF; GONG; Gérard Lockel; Glissant’s IME; Suzanne Roussi; Paul Niger; Andrée Blouin; Maryse Condé; Guinea’s Cultural Revolution; Awa Thiam; Francoise Ega; Yambo Ouologuem; Groupe du 6 Novembre; ACTAF & Revolution Afrique; Med Hondo; Sidney Sokhona; Nicolas Silatsa; Somankidi Coura; Edja Kungali; Sarah Maldoror; Sony Labou Tansi; Madeleine Beauséjour; and many, many more…

New writing by: Michaela Danjé; Hemley Boum; Olivier Marboeuf; Marie-Héléna Laumuno; Amzat Boukari-Yabara; Amandine Nana with Julius-Amédée Laou; Sarah Fila-Bakabadio; Pierre Crépon; DY Ngoy; Dénètem Touam Bona; Christelle Oyiri; Native Maqari; Seumboy Vrainom with Malcom Ferdinand; the “undercommons” collective translation workshop coordinated by Rosanna Puyol (Brook).

French/English/Kreyol


To purchase in print or as a PDF head to our online shop,or get copies from your nearest dealer.

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FESTAC 77 BOOK (Oct 2019)

Early in 1977, thousands of artists, writers, musicians, activists and scholars from Africa and the black diaspora assembled in Lagos for FESTAC ’77, the 2nd World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. With a radically ambitious agenda underwritten by Nigeria’s newfound oil wealth, FESTAC ’77 would unfold as a complex, glorious and excessive culmination of a half-century of transatlantic and pan-Africanist cultural-political gatherings.

As told by Chimurenga, this is the first publication to address the planetary scale of FESTAC alongside the personal and artistic encounters it made possible. Featuring extensive unseen photographic and archival materials, interviews and new commissions, the book relays the stories, words and works of the festival’s extraordinary cast of characters.

With: Wole Soyinka, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Ahmed Sékou Touré, Archie Shepp, Miriam Makeba, Allioune Diop, Jeff Donaldson, Louis Farrakhan, Stevie Wonder, Abdias do Nascimento, Keorapetse Kgositsile, Mario de Andrade, Ted Joans, Nadi Qamar,Carlos Moore, Ayi Kwei Armah, Ama Ata Aidoo, Johnny Dyani, Werewere Liking, Marilyn Nance, Barkley Hendricks, Mildred Thompson, Ibrahim El-Salahi, Jayne Cortez, Atukwei OkaiJonas Gwangwa, Theo Vincent, Lindsay Barrett, Gilberto de la Nuez, Sun Ra and many others.

And featuring new writing from: Akin Adesokan, Moses Serubiri, Harmony Holiday, Semeneh Ayalew, Hassan Musa, Emmanuel Iduma, Michael McMillan, Dominique Malaquais and Cedric Vincent, Molefe Pheto, Ugochukwu-Smooth C. Nzewi, Hermano Penna, Alice Aterianus.
.

Published by Chimurenga and Afterall Books, in association with Asia Art Archive, the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College and RAW Material Company, 2019.


The FESTAC 77 publication is available for purchase through our online shop.

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CHIMURENGA@20: MONDAY BLUES FOR SANDILE DIKENI

The most recent episode of Stories About Music in Africa is Monday Blues for Sandile Dikeni

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PASS LANDING AT KUNSTNERNES HUS, OSLO

From Wednesday, 17 – Saturday, 20 February, 2021, Pan African Space Station (PASS) broadcast a daily session, produced for ‘Actions of Art and Solidarity’, a group exhibition curated by Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) in Oslo and organised with Kunstnernes Hus. These PASS transmissions unpacked and expanded stories and research published in the Festac ’77 book in which we revisited the imaginative (im)possibilities of pan African festivals (the PANAFESTs) that took place in the utopian moments of the post-independence era.

Day 1, Wednesday 17 February:
Benin 1897 to Festac 1977, re-membering Erhabor Emokpae.
What are the legacies of Benin 1897? And how did the art of Erhabor Emokpae, designer of Festac’s visual identity, reignite the debate? Considering restitution debates and politics and the significance of Erhabor Emokpae, PASS hosted a conversation featuring Emokpae’s son the visual artist Isaac Emokpae, his granddaughter Ese Otubu, and the late Erhabor Emokpae himself.

Day 2, Thursday 18 February:
Freedom and Control, Technology and Science: a conversation with Arild Boman.
On this day in 1977, Agege Motor Road in Lagos, Fela Kuti’s Kalakuta Republic was infamously rampaged by military police. Arild Boman, a scientist, educator and experimental musician, witnessed the scene while attending Festac as a broadcasting consultant for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK). In this PASS session we inquired how, with colleagues at the University of Lagos, Boman came to co-produce a remarkable Festac questionnaire and co-organise the Festac ’77 Video Art Workshop.

Day 3, Friday 19 February:
Pan-Africanisms, Afro-Asian movement and Tricontinentalism.
Exploring red and black solidarities, PASS listened to a variety of voices, including Uhuru Phalafala and Christopher Lee, about conferences and festivals, Alex La Guma’s Soviet journeying, the project of Third-Worldism, and networks of writers and artistic groups culturally working for liberation.

Day 4, Saturday 20 February:
Amandla! Power to the people and poets: a conversation with Lindiwe Mabuza.
PASS welcomed an ambassador of cultural-politics, scholar-poet Lindiwe Mabuza to share stories of her consciousness-raising and activism in the USA, then at Festac ’77 and as the ANC’s Chief Representative in Sweden where she helped conduct the movements of Amandla Cultural Group.

(Photo from New Directions magazine)

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QAMATA PULA — an ancestral invocation

iPhupho L’ka Biko and Pan African Space Station presented QAMATA PULA, an ancestral invocation collapsing past, present and future, over three days at the Chimurenga Factory (157 Victoria Rd, Woodstock, Cape Town).

iMbewu / Seeds – Thursday, 3rd December

The many ancestors and living ones who preceded us planted seeds that allow us to dream different dreams. We pay tribute to the likes of Miriam Makeba, Madala Kunene, Busi Mhlongo, Stimela, Kutu and others who created conditions for us to become and overcome

iNhlabathi / Soil – Friday, 4th December

Because the past and present are always in conversation, we understand that we come from a lineage that demands from us responsibility. Joined by Cape Town-based artists, we interpret and share Biko’s dream,

uMthimkhulu / Tree – Saturday, 5th December Here is a tree rooted in Afrikan soil. It belongs to us, and those who come after us. On this sonic journey to our desired and foreseen future, we share with you the divine nectar of the tree’s

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Who Killed Kabila I

From December 13 – 17, 2017, Chimurenga installed a library of books, films, and visual material mapping extensive research that ask “Who Killed Kabila“, as the starting point for an in-depth investigation into power, territory and the creative imagination. This book catalogues all the research material produced and collected for this installation.

The equation is simple: the length of a Congolese president’s reign is proportional to his/her willingness to honour the principle that the resources of the Congo belong to others. Mzee Kabila failed.

Who killed Kabila is no mystery either. It is not A or B or C. But rather A and B and C. All options are both true and necessary – it’s the coming together of all these individuals, groups and circumstances, on one day, within the proliferating course of the history, that does it.

So telling this story isn’t merely be a matter of presenting multiple perspectives but rather of finding a medium able to capture the radical singularity of the event in its totality, including each singular, sometimes fantastical, historical fact, rumour or suspicion.

We’ve heard plenty about the danger of the single story – we want to explore its power. We take inspiration from the Congolese musical imagination, its capacity for innovation and its potential to allow us to think “with the bodily senses, to write with the musicality of one’s own flesh” (Mbembe).


The catalogue is now available for sale in the Chimurenga shop.

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CHIMURENGA@20: SISTER OUTSIDER

Yemisi Aribisala rails against the new fundamentalism cresting the wave of global feminism sweeping Nigeria. She challenges the gender imperialism implicit in its aspiration to uniform ideas of celebrity, power, erudition and beauty.

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Chimurenganyana: Rumblin’ by Dominique Malaquais (June 2012)

A text and image reflection on the “Rumble in the Jungle”, the Muhammad Ali / George Foreman boxing match held in Kinshasa in 1974. Norman Mailer started The Fight, Dominique Malaquais punched back. Artwork by Kakudji.

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CHIMURENGA@20: WHEN YOU KILL US, WE RULE!

In 1996, Keziah Jones visited Kalakuta Republic every day for a week to interview Fela Anikulapo Kuti. On the fifth day, after waiting six hours, Keziah got to speak with Fela, who he remarked kept you in “constant and direct eye contact” and spoke “in short bursts of baritone.”

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Chimurenganyana: In Search of Yambo Ouologuem by Christopher Wise (June 2012)

Yambo Ouologuem, the Malian author of Le devoir de violence and other literary works, has been shrouded in mystery since he disappeared from the West, effectively turning his back on literature. Christopher Wise goes in search.

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Notes for an Oratorio on small things that fall

Aditi Hunma reviews the launch of Notes for an Oratorio on Small Things That Fall, the latest offering from Ari Sitas

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Chimurenganyana: The Making of Mannenberg by John Edwin Mason (June 2012)

On a winter’s day in 1974, a group of musicians led by Abdullah Ibrahim entered a recording studio in the heart of Cape Town, and emerged, hours later, having changed South African music, forever. John Edwin Mason pens notes on the making of the icon and the anthem.

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LIBERATION RADIO: PEOPLE WHO THINK TOGETHER, DANCE TOGETHER #7

Conversations with Christian Nyampeta, featuring Hannah Black, Sasha Bonét, Natacha Nsabimana, Olu Oguibe and Emmanuel Olunkwa.
Live on PASS – 24-26 May 2022 – from 6pm

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Chimurenga@20: Beasts of No Nation

Whether immigrating, emigrating or just passing through, Africans suffer among the greatest indignities of cross-border travel, abroad and on the continent. Paula Akugizibwe recounts how the hand-me-down tools of divide and rule perpetuate the abuse.

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CHIMURENGA@20: THE WARM-UP

The xenophobic violence that swept through many communities in South Africa in 2008 was not a sudden phenomenon. Victims and an alleged instigator date the origins of this wave to a township in Pretoria, writes Kwanele Sosibo.

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Chimurenganyana: In Defence of the Films We Have Made by Odia Ofeimun (2009)

Odia Ofeimun is one of Nigeria’s foremost poets and political activists, and the author of the acclaimed collection The Poet Lied. Ofeimun was at one time the personal secretary of the Nigerian politician, Chief Obafemi Awolowo. He was also a member of the radical collective of The News, a weekly newspaper, which contributed to the downfall of Nigeria’s last dictatorship.

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The Chronic (August 2013)


This print edition is a 48-page broadsheet, packaged together with the 72-page Chronic Books supplement.

Writers in the broadsheet include Jon SoskePaula AkugizibweYves MintoogueAdewale Maja-PearceParsalelo KantaiFred Moten & Stefano HarneyCedric VincentDeji ToyeDerin AjaoTony MochamaNana Darkoa Sekyiamah,Agri IsmaïlLindokuhle NkosiBongani Kona,  Stacy Hardy, Emmanuel Induma, Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, Lolade AyewudiSimon Kuper and many others.

The  Chronic Books supplement is a self help guide on reading and writing, with contributions by Dave MckenzieAkin AdekosanFiston Nasser Mwanza, Yemisi OgbeVivek NyaranganPeter EnahoroTolu OgunlesiElnathan John,Rustum KozainOlufemi TerryAryan KaganofRustum KozainHarmony HolidaySean O’TooleGwen Ansell,Binyavanga Wainaina and more.

To purchase in print or as a PDF head to our online shop,or get copies from your nearest dealer.

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Chimurenganyana: Variations of the Beautiful in the World of Congolese Sounds by Achille Mbembe (2009)

Achille Mbembe is a research professor in history and politics at the University of the Witwatersrand and a senior researcher at WISER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research). He is the winner of the 2006 Bill Venter/Altron Award for his book On the Postcolony (University of California Press, 2001).

Lenwo Jean Abou Bakar Depara, known as Depara (1928-1997), was one of the leading documentarirts of Kinshasa’s post-independence social scene, and the official photographer to the Zairian singer Franco.

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Launching NOTES FOR AN ORATORIO ON SMALL THINGS THAT FALL

Wednesday, 13 April 2022
Chimurenga Factory
6pm

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Chimurenganyana: Thinking of Brenda by Njabulo Ndebele (2009)

Njabulo Ndebele is a writer and an academic. He is the author of The Cry of Winnie Mandela, Fools and Other Stories and Rediscovery of the Ordinary, a collection of essays.

Steve Gordon is a photographer and music producer based in Cape Town. He is the co-founder of Making Music Productions.

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LIBERATION RADIO: La Discothèque de Sarah Maldoror*

Selected by Ntone Edjabe

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Chimurenganyana: Blood Money – A Douala Chronicle by Dominique Malaquais (2009)

Dominique Malaquais is a historian of contemporary African art and culture & the author of Architecture, Pouvior et Dissidence au Cameroon.

Malam is a sculptor, painter and installation artist. He lives and works in Douala.

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iPhupho L’ka Biko – live at the Chimurenga Factory

Thursday, 31 March 2022
7pm

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Chimurenganyana: A Silent Way: Routes of South African Jazz, 1946-1978 by Julian Jonker (June 2009)

“Where to begin? There are, firstly, names:

Mankunku, McGregor, Brand.

Moeketsi, Moholo, Dyani.

Pukwana, Gwangwa, Coetzee.

Nkanuka, Ngcukana,

Mongezi Feza.

Just a few, to give you a taste. Don’t fret because you haven’t heard their records before. Say the names slowly, as you would recite a poem. Let the consonants roll languidly off your tongue and stretch your lips to pronounce each vowel, and you will already hear distant strains of music.

There are also photographs. Photographs by Basil Breaky, who documented the scene in Johannesburg and Cape Town just before its hottest players made their ways to Europe, leaving the cities to grow dark and silent. One picture: Abdullah Ibrahim, head bent over the keyboard of his piano, his arm stretched over into its gut, plucking its strings. Arched over, listening to some deeper music from the piano’s heart.”

Julian Jonker is a writer and cultural producer living in Cape Town. He is also a member of the Fong Kong Bantu Sound System, a DJ collective, and performs appropriationist sound as liberation chabalala. Basil Breakey is a photographer based in Cape Town. He is the author of the acclaimed Beyond The Blues – Township Jazz in the 60s and 70s.


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CHIMURENGA@20: A Silent Way – Routes of South African Jazz, 1946-1978

Where to begin? Which silences? There are many.

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Liberation Radio

Live on PASS: 15th-18th March 2022, 3-6pm

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Festac at 45: Idia Tales – Three Takes and a Mask*

By Dominique Malaquais and Cedric Vincent

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You Look Illegal by Paula Ihozo Akugizibwe

The latest addition to the Chimurenganyana series available now

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Madala ‘Bafo’ Kunene – LIVE at Slave Church, Cape Town

Known to many simply as ‘Bafo’, Madala Kunene is undeniably one of the best guitarists to have come out of Durban. This eclectic musician has an aura of calmness and wisdom that is meticulously replicated in his music – deep-rooted in spiritual and traditional rhythms. Bafo has performed his trance-inducing sounds at festivals around the world and collaborated with the likes of Busi MhlongoMabi TobejaneMoses Molelekwa and countless others. In 2003 he composed the score for Oscar-award nominated Yesterday – the first ever full length feature film in Zulu.

For his appearances at PASS in Cape Town, Bafo launched a concept titled “Sounds in the Darkness of Light”, a solo performance in complete darkness. This places the audience in a realm of darkness where only sounds illustrate the images of one’s immediate surroundings. A realm well understood by the visually impaired, who dwell in it daily. Members of blind societies from surrounding communities were invited to the event and escorted the artist himself onto the stage.

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CHIMURENGANYANA: THE FEAR AND LOATHING OUT OF HARARE BY DAMBUDZO MARECHERA (DEC 2021)

by Dambudzo Marechera

Available now at our online store.

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MEDITATIONS ON JIMI HENDRIX

by Greg Tate

All roads lead to Jimi Hendrix.

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SALUT GLISSANT

“Nothing is true, everything is alive.”
Moses März, imagines a conversation between Edoaurd Glissant and Patrick Chamoiseau about the Philosophy of Relation.

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THE BROTHER MOVES ON RETURNS

Chimurenga Factory
Saturday, 06 November 2021

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Pieces of Dominique

The writings, translations and ideas of our dearly departed friend, comrade and co-conspirator Dominique Malaquais (1964-2021), in Chimurenga

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Out of Sight

A short story by Yambo Ouologuem adapted from the French by Dominique Malaquais and Ntone Edjabe.

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Variations on the Beautiful in the Congolese World of Sounds

by Achille Mbembe; translated by Dominique Malaquais

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Monumental Failures

By Dominique Malaquais

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Rumblin’

By Dominique Malaquais

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JOKER’S WILD (SLIGHT RETURN)

By Dominique Malaquais

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ON THE BRIDGE

By Koffi Kwahulé (translated by Dominique Malaquais)

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FRANTZ – A STORY OF BONES

By Dominique Malaquais

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SEXING AFRICA, AGAIN – POP AS POLITICS: WATCH IT TONIGHT ON HBO

By Dominique Malaquais

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PAINT THE WHITE HOUSE BLACK – A CALL TO ARMS

By Dominique Malaquais

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Koltan Kills Kids

By Tsuba Ka 23 (Dominique Malaquais, Mowoso, Kongo Astronauts)

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CHE IN THE CONGO, ELECTRIC GUITARS AND THE INVENTION OF AFRICA

Featuring solos by Franco Luambo Makiadi, Pepe Felly Manuaku, Bansimba Baroza, Diblo Dibala, Dally Kimoko, Flamme Kapaya, Sarah Solo, Japonais Maladi and Kimbangu Solo; and commentary by Ray Lema

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NEW STORIES ABOUT MUSIC IN AFRICA

PASS presents: Salim Washington, Dalisu Ndlazi, Asher Gamedze in conversation

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READING FRED HO

Gwen Ansell and Salim Washington celebrate the revolutionary life, language and hard-ass leadership of an unconventional saxophonist, composer and generous collaborator.

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Survivor’s Guide to Smelling Naais

In the pre-Apocalypse, Zayaan Khan nurses the Apartheid hangover that carved up […]

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The Agronomist

Stacy Hardy follows the path of JJ Machobane, the social visionary, writer and agronomist from Lesotho, who challenged orthodox colonial thinking about land and land use.

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WHO WILL SAVE THE SAVIOURS?

A close gaze at the collective apathy that killed Dr. Sebi

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From Seven Modes for Hood Science

The black spirit is universally sick with dissimulation and at the same time triumphant in its incessantly performed healing, having turned suffering into a kind of spectacular wellness

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A Brief History of Fufu Pounding

The preparation of fufu is a far from the drudgery and waste of time bemoaned by the World Bank.

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XXYX Africa

LGBT Africa held two truths: you fuck, you die.

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Between the Lines of an Unpatriotic Presidential Pre-Recorded Address

FOURTH REPUBLIC 19 conducts a post-mortem on not-so-presidential minutes in recorded Nigerian history.

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The Enemy in Her Imagination: A Fable

Rahel first met the young, 11-year old boy, on December 21, 2006. That was the day after the war in Somalia was declared.

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On the Digital Application of Ancestral Work

African spirituality as practiced digitally was amplified by COVID-19.

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POVERTY IS OLDER THAN OPULENCE

Diego Maradona is the man who exploded the shame of the entire world in June 1986, in an historic dribble during a match between Argentina and England.

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Home is where the music is

Hugh Masekela (talking to Mothobi Mutloatse) I remember we use to live […]

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SALIM WASHINGTON, DALISU NDLAZI, ASHER GAMEDZE… IN CONVERSATION

Thursday, 24 June 2021 – 6pm

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EVEN WHEN MY SOUP-CURLERS SLUR BY GEORGIA ANNE MULDROW – OUT NOW!

A limited Chimurenganyana edition of Even When My Soup-Curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take by Georgia Anne Muldrow is now available.

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BLACK SUNLIGHT – A broadcast for Dambudzo Marechera on his 69th

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QAMATA PULA, an ancestral invocation

iPhupho L’ka Biko and Pan African Space Station present QAMATA PULA, an ancestral invocation collapsing past, present and future, over three days at the Chimurenga Factory

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A TRIBUTE TO DON CHERRY’S ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY (1967 – 1978)

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The 12th Annual Abdullah Ibrahim Festival

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The Memory of Victory

Ingrained in the DNA of every male growing up in Senegal is the tradition of Laamb, the Wolof designation for the sport – and by extension the business – of wrestling.

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Nigeria’s Superstar Men Of God

Who needs the God of the bible with his promises of trials and tribulations, crosses and paths of repentance? Yemisi Aribisala listens to the sermons, counts the money, watches the high-flying life of Nigeria’s mega-preachers and wonders.

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THE POETRY OF ABBEY LINCOLN

Live from 5pm
Friday 21 August 2020
panafricanspacestation.org.za

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Abbey Lincoln’s Scream: Poetic Improvisation as a Way of Life

We are standing under a glaring spotlight screaming at the tops of our lungs, from the backs of our throats which we grind together to access black blues unwords, thymus against heart, blue in green meridian, that aquamarine plexus that water and sky correct and regulate in us.

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Yellow Fever, Nko?

Skin bleaching is often described as a manifestation of ‘colo-mentality’. However, argues Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, mimesis here is both an affirmation and a contestation of power.

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RIP PAPA GEORGE

Exile demands contemplation because it is unavoidably real for those who experience […]

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TRACKS

MADEYOULOOK collective met with photographer Santu Mofokeng to establish the point of crossroads, where things are in motion and where things remain still

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Quel Est L’Endroit Idéal

Les Brasseries du Cameroun is the country’s largest industry and dedicated to guaranteeing a steady flow of liquid amber to the vast proliferation of bars, restaurants, nightclubs and other unidentified nightspots – some still in Maquis-style hiding – that have mushroomed all over the city.

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RIP Binyavanga Wainaina

Binyavanga Wainaina was a friend, a Chimurenga founding father, an award winning writer, author, journalist, chef, lover, a literary revolutionary and an inspiration. We pay tribute.

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Neo Muyanga – The Sex For Money No Power Mixtape

PASS founder, a composer and musician Neo Muyanga highlights the currents and […]

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Festac ’77 – a faction by Akin Adesokan

Was Festac 77 curated by Esu Elegba? Akin Adesokan’s faction explores art […]

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The Tyelera Moment

by Thabo Jijana  On December 13, 2016, in Salem Party Club v […]

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TO REFUSE THAT WHICH HAS BEEN REFUSED TO YOU

Fred Moten and Saidiya Hartman sit down to talk about the temporal […]

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They Won’t Go When I Go

A Manifesto/ Meditation on State of Black Archives in America and throughout the Diaspora by Harmony Holiday

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THINGS THAT GO IN AND OUT OF THE BODY

How can we think about bodies and circulation without deferring to the […]

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THINKING TOO MUCH

Silence and dark humour seem like the most authentic way for people […]

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PORTRAIT OF MYSELF AS MY FATHER

A CONVERSATION WITH NORA CHIPAUMIRE Born in Mutare, Zimbabwe, and based in New […]

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New Trade Routes: Soccer Cities

We make our own maps tracing the new trade routes for the […]

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Jollof Diaries – A letter from the frontline

By Folakunle Oshun 30 October 2015 It was the first day of […]

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How To Cook Your Husband The African Way

Stacy Hardy is a writer and senior editor at Chimurenga. She is […]

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No Congo, No Technology

Post-disciplinary artist, Maurice Mbikayi, was born in Kinshasa, in 1974. His country […]

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Second Transition

“Second Transition” refers to the phase of liberation struggle in South Africa […]

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ALL I CAN SAY FOR NOW

By Jean-Christophe Lanquetin* During the last five years of Unathi Sigenu’s life, […]

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Dagga

Rustum Kozain muses over the cultural and alternative relations built, negotiations and dealings made as a resident of Cape Town.

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Bread of Life

Commercial bread contains additives to accelerate production and to improve the look […]

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African Cookbooks and Excess Luggage

By Yemisi Aribisala There is a sense of justice and spirit of resignation […]

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How to Wear a Kitchen

Yemisi Aribisala ponders the small-minded commentary on the room best kept by […]

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“Angazi, but I’m sure”: A Raw Académie Session

RAW Material Company is a Dakar-based centre for art, knowledge and society; […]

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Nollywood Kiss

Is kissing a Nigerian habit or merely the preoccupation of neurotic French […]

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brinjals

By Cullen Goldblatt    A half teaspoonful of cream of tartar to stop […]

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Marikana

On 16 August 2012, the South African Police Service opened fire on […]

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Screaming Through the Galaxy

Jamaican-born poet, musician and visual artist Femi Dawkins a.k.a. Jimmy Rage, explores pain […]

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Climbing- A Letter from San Francisco

By Nick Hadikwa Mwaluko Loss is life’s only language. Moving from mask to […]

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The Papers

In a place — geographically, mentally, physically — where everything is guided […]

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The Mission of Forgetting

Joshua Craze offers a sobering analysis of the fantasy that is the […]

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How Third World Students Liberated the West

In a twist to mainstream tropes of radical student movements of the 1960s, and their impact on the history of political thought and action, Pedro Monaville argues that the terrains of the Third World, and particularly the history of student movements in Congo, are vital to explore if we are to makes sense of how that period informs the present.

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Curry Chronicles- Dal or Dhal, not Dull

There are many shades of dhal and numerous ways to hull and […]

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Adult Alphabet

‘R for rent, S for sex, T for evermore taxing things….’ Rustum Kozain‘s […]

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Sexing Africa, Again

Dominique Malaquais spins together Lil’ Kim, burkas, Muslim women, Somali Mata-Haris and […]

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Hanging Participle

By Anna Kente I am becoming. I have the proof. Documents, photos, evidence. […]

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Creating Theatre: A George Hallett Photo Essay

“Exile demands contemplation because it is unavoidably real for those who experience […]

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The Curry Chronicles, Part 1

Rustum Kozain dishes up some definitives on the many incarnations of curry […]

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Boyhood and Transit

Reliving his personal journey to developing a passion for the game, Bongani […]

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Queenstown

By Sandile Dikeni The grass in Queenstown was pink in 1996. Or, […]

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Lotus Magazine

By Nida Ghouse In the wake of Youssef El-Sebai’s death, the streets of Cairo swelled in protest. […]

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Under Nelson Mandela Boulevard

A Story About Cape Town’s Tanzanian Stowaways By Sean Christie Images by David […]

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I Think I’ll Call it Morning

 by Bongani Kona   Penumbra Songeziwe Mahlangu Kwela Books,  2013 Sometime in […]

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Black Man in the White Suit

A Letter from Cape Town by Kiluanji Kia Henda. In 2008, the […]

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In a Time of Boko Haram

by Elnathan John. I. DRESSES Beneath the oil-stained, flattened pillow that Mansir sits […]

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Re-Membering the Name of God

Wendell Hassan Marsh maps the trajectories of Islam as it evolved in […]

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The Power of Green Crayons

Agri Ismaïl recalls growing up off the map – his Kurdish identity […]

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Secret Countries

  This map features in the new Chronic, an edition in which […]

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How to Eat a Forest

Billy Kahora recounts a journey into Kenya’s Mau Forest, where he confronts […]

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Living Dangerously in Petroluanda

António Tomás picks through the post-independence architectural ruins of Angola’s capital city […]

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Neopats and Repats

    This map features in the new Chronic, an edition in which […]

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Reviews in Brief

by Stacy Hardy.   Our Lady of the Nile Scholastique Mukasonga (transl. […]

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Portrait of the Artist as a Daughter

by Ed Pavlić. “Where material is absent, dialectics is groundless.” – James Snead, […]

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Undoing the Spell

by Ben Verghese. Many of the dominant narratives of the partition focus on […]

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The Undeveloped Intellectual in Zombie-land

by Ibrahim Farghali. This is Rakha’s second novel after his début, The Book […]

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Breaking the Rules Beautifully

by Bwesigye Bwa Mwesigire. “Breaking the rules attracts implications, Jennifer.” I overhear British […]

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The Other Brother

by Bongani Kona. At the centre of Masande Ntshanga’s debut novel, The Reactive, […]

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We almost died thrice…

A letter from Lagos by Wanlov the Kubolor. I dey lie for […]

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The Bite and the Embrace

A Letter from Malabo by Recaredo Silebo Boturu. I’m writing from here in […]

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The Face: Cartography of the Void

Chris Abani has lived in several places and been assumed to be […]

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New Trade Routes

    This features in the new Chronic, an edition in which […]

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After Oil Water

  This features in the new Chronic, an edition in which we […]

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African War Machines

    This map features in the new Chronic, an edition in which […]

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Yambo Ouloguem: Postcolonial Writer, Anti-Wahhabist Militant

Christopher Wise recalls conversations and texts of the Malian author, whose deep […]

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In Suburbia

Suburban South Africa is glowing. The sun is up, the trees are […]

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Preliminary Notes for a Mediterranean Manifesto

Connecting ancience and modern roots/routes Rasheed Araeen redraws the boundaries and limits of identity. […]

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Gateway

A video-work from Berni Searle‘s “Black smoke rising” trilogy; the title alluding to the […]

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Alex killers are ‘proud’ of attacks on foreigners

Gcina Ntsaluba reports from where Wally Serote wrote: “When I lie on your breast […]

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The Story of an African Farm

The Chronic visits wine farms across the Boland area of the Western Cape and […]

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Kangsen Feka Wakai Can’t Breathe

Transition are calling for responses to the latest sweep of murders by police of unarmed black […]

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Midway Between Silence and Speech

The art and incarnation of Justine Gaga explores the multi-layered and emotionally […]

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Exitour as Rhizome

“Why did we embark on this insane trip?” Having journeyed together from Douala to […]

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Une Hommage à Goddy Leye

With his imagination, sharp wit and all-round uncontournable wholesome beautyness, Goddy Leye has […]

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The Beautiful Beast

by Goddy Leye         This still from Goddy Leye’s […]

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The G.Spot Protagonists

by Goddy Leye I am sitting in front of the Cologne cathedral, amazed by […]

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Black Skin, White Ass

Hydroquinine, bleach, lime juice: take your pick. Each of them will lighten […]

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Honouring Somaliness

Binyavanga Wainaina and Diriye Osman sit down in south London to speak of […]

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This is a pigment of my imagination

Looking like a ‘Negro’ in India and searching for a connection has […]

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Out of sight and out of mind in High Care

Mike Abrahams recently spent seven weeks as an involuntary patient at Valkenberg […]

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Floyd Mayweather and Improvised Modalities of Rhythm

by Steve Coleman What makes boxing the sweet science is not two […]

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The Case of Sipho Mchunu

by Bongani Kona In her brilliant review of Didier Fassin’s book, When Bodies Remember: […]

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Why music is better than photography

Why music is better than photography: An argument in two parts by Sean […]

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AF 888

AF 888 – a letter from above the Mediterranean Sea by Christian Botale […]

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L’impossible n’est pas Camerounais!

Kangsen Feka Wakai traces personal lineage, and the often blurred and disputed […]

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Visioncarnation

by Orijit Sen                 Orijit Sen is […]

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The Black Guru

Gael Reagon meets the spirit formerly known as Zebulon Dread. On Friday […]

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A New Myth

Illustrator Nolan Oswald Dennis’s ongoing collaboration with Johannesburg-based performance art ensemble The Brother […]

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Masquerade

Michael Jackson alive in Nigeria Featuring the maverick Ejiogbe Twins Photographed by […]

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It’s only a matter of acceleration now

by  Binyavanga Wainaina 1. I am about to interview Youssou N’Dour. I […]

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When You Kill Us, We Rule

Audre Lorde‘s poem, “The Black Unicorn”, is woven into rhetorical charcoal drawings by […]

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Not only our land but also our souls

Andile Mngxitama challenges historical and contemporary rhetoric that positions land theft in […]

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A Brief History of Throwing Shit

by Rustum Kozain.  Shit, muck, drek, kak. Faecal matter. We humans have a […]

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Method After Fela

by Akin Adesokan   “You reckon a guy just goes and cuts […]

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I am a homosexual, Mum by Binyavanga Wainaina

(A lost chapter from One Day I Will Write About This Place) […]

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Woza Moya

Maakomele R. Manaka revisits a soundtrack of his dreams, long and rhythmic […]

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Homeless in the Afterlife

Death in the diaspora remains a difficult part of the immigrant experience. […]

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Paris-Algiers, Underground Class

by Mustapha Benfodil  It’s romance landed me this job. I am a mailman […]

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I Travel with the Dead

Sudirman Adi Makmur spends an inordinate amount of time alone or in the […]

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The Last Angel of History

Filmmaker, theorist and co-founder of the Black Audio Film Collective (BAFC) John […]

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Setting The Pace is a Small Town’s Big Business

The ‘mystique’ of the Kenyan long-distance runner is to be found not […]

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Even the Dead

Jeremy Cronin reports of corrupt apartheid-era games; questioning our (in)ability to remember the […]

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You’re… Terminated

Under the parental shadow of Table Mountain, children play on the streets […]

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Stickfighting Days

A good sport? Olufemi Terry summons up the spirit of (K.Sello Duiker’s) Ah-zoo-ray […]

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A Three Point Shot from Andromeda

When not teaching white boy’s how to shuffle, acting Tuff, or fixing […]

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A Corpse and its Jurisdiction – a letter from Lagos

Akin Adesokan tropes on the detective genre after he stumbles on an […]

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George Osodi

George Osodi is a photographer from “the oil-rich Niger Delta region”. His images […]

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Lagos: A Pilgrimage in Notations

Having lived away from Nigeria for most of his adult life – […]

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Che

First published in 1968 in Buenos Aires, the biography of Ernesto “Che” […]

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Death by Memory [of Freedom]; Truth & Reconciliation

A tryptych in honour of Steve Biko. Firstly, Graeme Arendse, as his alter-ego Ramgee, presents In […]

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Hauling Humans: a tricky business for trans-border truckers

Veteran long-distance driver, Aden, has been witness and participant in the business […]

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Howl Marikana

Announcing his intentions with a howl that echoes Ginsberg, Aryan Kaganof offers […]

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Itineraries

These maps by Philippe Rekacewicz show how the phenomenon of migration relates to […]

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Who’s Free, Who’s Not, Who Was, Who Wasn’t, and Who’s Dead: And, Are You Sure You Know Which Way Is Up?

A Letter from Istanbul by Ed Pavlic   Trayvon remains underground, to my […]

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The Road To Wellville

The Institute of Naturopathy and Yogic Sciences occupies some seventy acres of […]

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Suspect Sammy

A Letter from Toronto by Andrea Meeson   It’s another Monday morning after […]

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Memento Mori

A Letter from Harlem by Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts. When I came home from abroad, […]

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Body Paths

The city, for many African immigrants, offers a horizon of hope, but […]

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Speech to the Science Graduation Ceremony of the University of Witwatersrand, 2008

Good Evening. I will use my own life history tonight to argue […]

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