Advanced Search

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
pass_pop_up
sidebar
wooframework
slide
african_issues
book_series
magzine_issues
african_live_events
research_posts
inprint_posts
installation_posts
periodicals_posts
ecwid_menu_item
sp_easy_accordion
acf-field
give_payment
give_forms
acf-field-group
Filter by Categories
African Cities Reader
Archive
Arts & Pedagogy
Books & Oration
Cash & Commerce
Chimurenga Library
Chimurenga Magazine
Chronic
Comics
Faith & Ideology
Featured
Gaming
Healing & bodies
Library Book Series
Live Events
Maps
Media & Propaganda
Music
News
PASS
PASS Pop Up
Research
Reviews
Systems of Governance
Video

Archive | Gaming RSS feed for this section

CHIMURENGA@20: STICKFIGHTING DAYS

Everyone knows I’m a two-stick man. But, I’m not ready to go up against Markham again just yet. Or any of the other top stickfighters. I’ve been trying some new moves. I feel close to a breakthrough in terms of technique. But it’s not quite there

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

IMAGI-NATION NWAR (APRIL 2021)

imagi-nation nwar – genealogies of the black radical imagination in the francophone world

de-composed, an-arranged and re-produced by Chimurenga

feat. Mongo Beti & Odile Biyidi’s Peuples Noirs, Peuples Africains; Elsie Haas, Julius-Amédée Laou; Cheikh Anta Diop; FEANF; GONG; Gérard Lockel; Glissant’s IME; Suzanne Roussi; Paul Niger; Andrée Blouin; Maryse Condé; Guinea’s Cultural Revolution; Awa Thiam; Francoise Ega; Yambo Ouologuem; Groupe du 6 Novembre; ACTAF & Revolution Afrique; Med Hondo; Sidney Sokhona; Nicolas Silatsa; Somankidi Coura; Edja Kungali; Sarah Maldoror; Sony Labou Tansi; Madeleine Beauséjour; and many, many more…

New writing by: Michaela Danjé; Hemley Boum; Olivier Marboeuf; Marie-Héléna Laumuno; Amzat Boukari-Yabara; Amandine Nana with Julius-Amédée Laou; Sarah Fila-Bakabadio; Pierre Crépon; DY Ngoy; Dénètem Touam Bona; Christelle Oyiri; Native Maqari; Seumboy Vrainom with Malcom Ferdinand; the “undercommons” collective translation workshop coordinated by Rosanna Puyol (Brook).

French/English/Kreyol


To purchase in print or as a PDF head to our online shop,or get copies from your nearest dealer.

Share this post:
Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenganyana: Rumblin’ by Dominique Malaquais (June 2012)

A text and image reflection on the “Rumble in the Jungle”, the Muhammad Ali / George Foreman boxing match held in Kinshasa in 1974. Norman Mailer started The Fight, Dominique Malaquais punched back. Artwork by Kakudji.

Share this post:
Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Chronic (August 2013)


This print edition is a 48-page broadsheet, packaged together with the 72-page Chronic Books supplement.

Writers in the broadsheet include Jon SoskePaula AkugizibweYves MintoogueAdewale Maja-PearceParsalelo KantaiFred Moten & Stefano HarneyCedric VincentDeji ToyeDerin AjaoTony MochamaNana Darkoa Sekyiamah,Agri IsmaïlLindokuhle NkosiBongani Kona,  Stacy Hardy, Emmanuel Induma, Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, Lolade AyewudiSimon Kuper and many others.

The  Chronic Books supplement is a self help guide on reading and writing, with contributions by Dave MckenzieAkin AdekosanFiston Nasser Mwanza, Yemisi OgbeVivek NyaranganPeter EnahoroTolu OgunlesiElnathan John,Rustum KozainOlufemi TerryAryan KaganofRustum KozainHarmony HolidaySean O’TooleGwen Ansell,Binyavanga Wainaina and more.

To purchase in print or as a PDF head to our online shop,or get copies from your nearest dealer.

Share this post:
Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Liberation Radio

Live on PASS: 15th-18th March 2022, 3-6pm

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Festac at 45: Black Sopranos in Handwoven Clothes

FESTAC was a cultural-cum-intellectual feast funded principally by the military government of Nigeria. For this reason, it is important to highlight the general political climate of the world in the mid-1970s, as it played a role in the choices that the managers of the Nigerian state had to make in bringing about this cultural event.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

L’AUTRE AFRIQUE

As its name suggests, The Other Africa aims to provide a different view of the continent. Founded by acclaimed journalist Jean-Baptiste Placca this Paris based, pan-African monthly was started in 1997 in response to the clichéd, reductive and often pathological depiction of Africa in the Western media. In contrast The Other Africa sought to force the diversity of opinion, the multiple realities, unique terminology and complexities of daily life across a vast continent of over fifty nations. “Beside the Africa of all the calamities that we know (dictatorships, disease, AIDS, corruption, civil wars and everything else), there is also Africa that is serious, which makes constructive things.”

The Other Africa was thus characterized by rigorous investigation, in-depth analysis, detailed coverage and on-the-ground reporting. The journal is also a tool for teaching and writing for African journalists as “agents of development”.

The Other Africa was based in Paris but it was distributed widely both in Europe and Africa, taking advantage of the French communication and transport infrastructure provided by the global network of journalists, analysts and photographers. This is difficult to sustain and financial perspectives forced the Other Africa’s closure after only three years. In 2001 Placca resurrected the newspaper as a weekly, but despite a clearer



traduction française par Scarlett Antonio

Publi au Maroc en 1966, Lamalif a pris son nom des deux lettres de l’alphabet arabe qui forment le mot “la”, signifiant “non”. Ce jeu de mots malin résumait l’objectif du magazine. Lancé après la défaite de l’opposition marocaine (Union socialiste des Forces Populaires) par la monarchie, Lamalif était une forme de défit. “Le but dans cette tragique situation n’était pas de perdre espoir, de construire une alternative,” expliquaient les fondateurs, Zakia Daoud et Mohamed Loghlam.

Pendant ces 22 ans d’existence, Lamalif était caractérisé par sa rigueur intellectuelle et sa position politique radicale. Reportant sur les problèmes sociaux, culturels et économiques, d’un point de vue politique, il s’est affermi comme “un espace pour la réflexion et une force de défit considérable.”

Ses débats idéologiques parmi les journalistes, économistes, académiciens, politiciens et révolutionnaires devinrent des références intellectuelles mondiales et ont prouvé être fructueux dans le développement de nombreux écrivains et meilleurs penseurs marocains. Son intérêt sur les arts et la culture était également influents. Les reportages de Lamalif mettaient fréquemment en vedette le travail fait par des artistes et ses articles sur les films ont contribué à l’essor du cinéma marocain dans les années 1970.

Lamalif n’a néanmoins jamais été exclusif et s’est vite établi une place parmi un grand nombre de lecteurs différents. Ironiquement, ce fut ce succès qui mena les publications à leur ultime fin. Sa popularité et sa position de franc-parler attira la colère des autorités et il n’a pas fallu attendre longtemps avant que Daoud soit “considéré comme l’Ennemi Publique.” Après des années de menaces, de censures et saisies, Lamalif fut forcé de fermer définitivement en 1988.


PEOPLE

Jean Gourmelin, Abdellah Laraoui, Paul Pascon, Abdelkebir Khatibi, Abdallah Laroui, Fathallah Oualalou Oualalou, Abdelaali Benamour, Habib El Malki, Khalid Alioua, Bruno Etienne, Mohammed Jibril, Mohammed Tozy, Aboubakr Jamai, Salim Jay, Najib Boudraa


FAMILY TREE

  • Almaghrib(1937)
  • Jeune Afrique (1960)
  • Al Mouharrir(1962)
  • Addoustour(1963)
  • Souffles (1966)
  • Anoual
  • TelQuel (2001), which founder Ahmed Reda Benchemsi initially wanted to call Lamalifin tribute.

RE/SOURCES

  • Lamalif on Wikipedia
  • Zakya Daoud, Les Années Lamalif, Tarik Editions, 2007
  • Laila Lalami, “The Lamalif Years”, February 15, 2007
  • Abdeslam Kadiri, “Portrait. Les mille vies de Zakya Daoud”, TelQuel, 2005.
  • “An interview with Zakia Daoud”, APN, March 9, 2007
  • “Rétrospectivee : Il était une fois la presse”, TelQuel
Share this post:
Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Ready, Willing & Able

Lolade Adewuyi profiles one of the continent’s most successful football coaches – the Big Boss, as he is widely referred to – and considers the arguments for more faith, more respect and more investment in the abilities of home-grown trainers.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Pieces of Dominique

The writings, translations and ideas of our dearly departed friend, comrade and co-conspirator Dominique Malaquais (1964-2021), in Chimurenga

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

AFRICAN FILM

Published by Drum in Nigeria and later also Kenya and Ghana in the early 60s, African Film was just one of the many photo comics or “look books” that flooded English-speaking West Africa in the early post colonial era. Catering to the new urban youth, the series featured the mythical persona of Lance Spearman, a.k.a. “The Spear,” a black James Bond-like crime fighter as the central character.

In contrast to the racist stereotype of the uncivilised, uneducated, spear-carrying cannibal, or the eroticised “noble savage” that characterised the depictions of Africans in most Western comic books from the time, Spearman was sharp, stylish and sophisticated. Combining re-appropriated Western references with a distinctly African cultural identity, he reflected a newly defined black Atlantic modernity. Here was a comic book hero that presented a potential critique of colonialism, as well as a significant variation in how the genre classically figured normality and otherness.

While the series was criticised for its sometimes stereotyped portrayals of blackness and masculinity, it none the less had a lasting influence in fostering postcolonial pride and identity. Its combination of extreme (often cartoon-like) violence, with pastiches of early Hollywood melodramas, dashes of romance and glamour – via the street and touches of black nationalism preceded the Blaxploitation explosion in American cinemas in the 70s and its use of inventive DIY tactics to overcome budget constraints (Spearman’s trademark Corvette Stingray was often a picture of a dinky-toy) had a lasting influence on the Nollywood industry.



Into this culturally colonized milieu came a new comic published by Drum Publications called African Film featuring Lance Spearman, a raffish and nattily-dressed black super cop with an ever-present Panama hat. And we all instantly fell deeply in love with him. No one forced Spearman on us. For the first time, we had a comic hero who was actually black like us. 

Black Like Us by Tunde Giwa 


Spearman… Lance Spearman – the name synonymous with the intrepid hero of the photo-comic staple, African Film, started by the publisher of South Africa’s Drum Magazine, produced by fledgling writers and read voraciously by 1970s Nigerian schoolboys, including Uzor Maxim Uzoatu, who dreamed of wars and victories other than those around them.

THE IMPOSSIBLE DEATH OF AN AFRICAN CRIME BUSTER by Uzor Maxim Uzoatu


Traduction Française Par Scarlett Antoniou

Edité par Drum au Nigéria et également plus tard au Kenya et Ghana dans les années 60, African Film était juste une des nombreuses bandes dessinées photo ou “livres à regarder” qui a envahi l’ouest de l’Afrique anglophone durant le début de la période postcoloniale. S’adressant à la nouvelle jeunesse urbaine, les séries avaient pour vedette le personnage mythique de Lance Spearman, a.k.a. “The Spear” (La Lance), un lutteur noir contre les crimes ressemblant à James Bond, comme caractère principal.

En contraste avec le stéréotype raciste du cannibale porteur de lance barbare et non instruit, ou le “noble sauvage” érotiques qui caractérisaient les représentations des africains dans la plupart des livres comiques occidentaux du temps, Spearman était tranchant, élégant et sophistiqué. Allié aux références occidentales de nouveau appropriées avec l’identité culturelle distinctement africaine, il reflétait une modernité atlantique noire nouvellement définie. C’était là un héro de livre comique qui présentait une critique potentielle du colonialisme ainsi qu’une variation considérable dans la manière avec laquelle le tableau de genre illustrait classiquement la normalité et l’ensemble des autres.

Tandis que les séries étaient critiquées pour ses portraits parfois stéréotypes de la couleur noire et de la masculinité, il a eu cependant une influence de longue durée dans la manière d’encourager l’identité et la fierté postcoloniales. Son mélange d’extrême violence (souvent comme des dessins animés), avec des pastiches d’anciens mélodrames Hollywoodiens, des moments de romance et de séductions à travers la rue et les touches de nationalisme noir, précédait l’explosion du ‘Blaxploitation’ (exploitation des noirs) dans les cinémas américains des années 70 et son utilisation de tactiques inventives faites maison pour surmonter les contraintes de budget (la marque déposée de Spearman Corvette Stingray était souvent l’image d’un jouet mignon) ont eu une influence de longue durée sur l’industrie Nollywood.


FAMILY TREE

  • Boom featuring Fearless Fang
  • The Stranger
  • Sadness & Joy

RE/SOURCES

Share this post:
Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Rumblin’

By Dominique Malaquais

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The poetics of Futbol

The Touch It would have to be a bird, stilled on a […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

POVERTY IS OLDER THAN OPULENCE

Diego Maradona is the man who exploded the shame of the entire world in June 1986, in an historic dribble during a match between Argentina and England.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Ibadan, Soutin and the Puzzle of Bower’s Tower

The jingle would survive the event, as the poetry of a battle-cry outlives a war, but that eventuality belonged in the future.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Genres of the Human

  In his new book, The Sound of Culture: Diaspora and Black […]

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

Zidane’s Melancholy

Zidane watched the Berlin sky, not thinking of anything, a white sky […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Poverty is Older than Opulence

Maverick Serbian filmmaker, Emir Kusturica (Time of the Gypsies; Underground), talks with […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Zinedine Zidane and and the event of the secret

Grant Farred produces a Derridean reading of Zidane’s world-stopping head butt.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

To Defend and to Question

Zinedine Zidane has described him as “the greatest footballer of all” and […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Zidane, a 21st century portrait

Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parenno’s ambitious 2006 cinematic collaboration, Zidane, a 21st […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

A master of bling with feline style

Writing just after the 2011 Africa Cup of Nations,  Achille Mbembe* looks […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

“Angazi, but I’m sure”: A Raw Académie Session

RAW Material Company is a Dakar-based centre for art, knowledge and society; […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

POLITRICKS IN THE STADIUM

Melanie Boehi discusses how, for politicians, sports tournaments such as the upcoming […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

SOMEWHERE NEAR THE BEGINNING OF THE MATCH

By Abdourahman A. Waberi* (translated by Carolyn Shread). A small coastal town on […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Why Ethiopia won the World Cup in 2034

Deji Bryce Olukotun recalls the arc of history-in-the-making that results in a […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Sports Chatter

Simon Kuper discusses the drivel in the drip-feed that is mainstream sports […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Lexicon of Love

The language of football is arguably nowhere more verbose and loquacious than […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Writing Football

By Juan Villoro It’s unlikely you’ll be a fan of any sport […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

War and Spirits

By Kirby Mania The timing of the publication of Confession of the […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Translating Tram 83

Roland Glasser meets author Fiston Mwanza Mujila in Paris while getting to […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Invention of African Football

Moses März documents his fleeting orbit of the “African” football scene, from […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Fighting Shadows

Lidudumalingani Mqombothi hails from a place where the game of ukuqula is […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Rumblin’

By Dominique Malaquais  Tell It To The World April 1st 1974.[1] Before […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Shift The Goalposts Of Disadvantage

By Simon Kuper Every year, in an election you may have missed, […]

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

Ready, Willing and Able

Lolade Adewuyi profiles one of the continent’s most successful football coaches – […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea and Ghana Dominate Women’s Football

In a brief history of women’s football on the continent, Shina Oludari […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

‘YOU DON’T GET PAID FOR SOCCER IN SOUTH AFRICA’

Playing football at the highest level in South Africa requires as much […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Roger and Me

Akin Adesokan writes in exaltation of the game of tennis, the sheer […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Boyhood and Transit

Reliving his personal journey to developing a passion for the game, Bongani […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

New Trade Routes

    This features in the new Chronic, an edition in which […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Floyd Mayweather and Improvised Modalities of Rhythm

by Steve Coleman What makes boxing the sweet science is not two […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

A History of Blacks on the Green

In an attempt to dispel the myth that renders black golfers as […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Setting The Pace is a Small Town’s Big Business

The ‘mystique’ of the Kenyan long-distance runner is to be found not […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Fuzzy Goo’s Guide (to the Earth)

Playing with words, the original Black Heretic Insider Dambudzo Marechera writes his own rulebook […]

Continue Reading Comments { 4 }

Even the Dead

Jeremy Cronin reports of corrupt apartheid-era games; questioning our (in)ability to remember the […]

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

Nothing but… Grobbelaar

A line-up of football stories wouldn’t be complete without Simon Kuper. In a […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Banyana Banyana

As footballers and coaches typically spiel, it’s a game of two halves. […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Ready, Willing & Able

Lolade Adewuyi profiles one of the continent’s most successful football coaches – […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Shoes

Shoeless and bible blacked, Sandile Dikeni recounts childhood kickabouts on uneven playing fields […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

You’re… Terminated

Under the parental shadow of Table Mountain, children play on the streets […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Stickfighting Days

A good sport? Olufemi Terry summons up the spirit of (K.Sello Duiker’s) Ah-zoo-ray […]

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

Language Games

For poet Karen Press opposites are already united; they depend on each […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The New Normal

  Oscar Pistorius first gained international fame amid a raging debate over […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

If you want to see the African Game go to a Stadium

Knox Robinson If you want to see the African Game go to […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial