Advance Search

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
pass_pop_up
sidebar
wooframework
slide
african_issues
book_series
magzine_issues
african_live_events
research_posts
inprint_posts
installation_posts
periodicals_posts
ecwid_menu_item
sp_easy_accordion
acf-field
give_payment
give_forms
acf-field-group
Filter by Categories
African Cities Reader
Archive
Arts & Pedagogy
Books & Oration
Cash & Commerce
Chimurenga Library
Chimurenga Magazine
Chronic
Comics
Faith & Ideology
Featured
Gaming
Healing & bodies
Library Book Series
Live Events
Maps
Media & Propaganda
Music
News
PASS
PASS Pop Up
Research
Reviews
Systems of Governance
Video

Search results for "Ben Verghese"

Chimurenga 7 – Kaapstad! (and Jozi, the night Moses died) (July 2005)

A collection of musings – in words, images and sounds – from beneath the processed skin of Cape Town, by Gabeba Baderoon, Sandile Dikeni, Julian Jonker,

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenga 6 – Orphans of Fanon (October 2004)

A series of conversations, real and imagined, on the “pitfalls of national consciousness” by Mustapha Benfodil, Achille Mbembe, Charles Mudede,

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Reproducing Festac ’77: A secret among a family of millions

Kwanele Sosibo speaks with Ntone Edjabe about the creation of, and thinking behind, the FESTAC ’77 publication.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Where Is This Place

Bracketed and intersected by 9/11, Mwai Kibaki’s ascent to power, Kenya’s post-election violence, and Barak Obama’s election; written primarily during Binyavanga Wainaina’s residence in the US, or at least away from Kenya; set in Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, Nigeria and the US; and marked by sounds from Congo, South Africa and the US, along with the Kenyan benga; and shifting, frequently, between the confessional and the ethnographic, the nativist and the cosmopolitan, the national and the postnational, how might one describe where One Day I Will Write About This Place lives as it travels?

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Liner Notes

As listening trends move rapidly to the online interface, the knowing of […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

“We need more contact zones to create a space for critical discussion, and to propagate and exchange a continuous cultural benefit.”

A conversation between Professor Muyiwa Falaiye and Mudi Yahaya Muyiwa Falaiye: I […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Undoing the Spell

by Ben Verghese. Many of the dominant narratives of the partition focus on […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Beneath the Underdog

Fighter, soldier, poet, arguably the PR-unit and embodiment of the Economic Freedom […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Sketches of ‘Trane

    Atang Tshikare is a artist and illustrator based in Cape […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The skin I’m in: Afro-Bengali solidarity and possible futures

Naeem Mohaiemen reviews Vivek Bald’s Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenga 7 – Kaapstad! (and Jozi, the night Moses died) (July 2005)

A collection of musings – in words, images and sounds – from beneath the processed skin of Cape Town, by Gabeba Baderoon, Sandile Dikeni, Julian Jonker,

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenga 6 – Orphans of Fanon (October 2004)

A series of conversations, real and imagined, on the “pitfalls of national consciousness” by Mustapha Benfodil, Achille Mbembe, Charles Mudede,

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

“Angazi, but I’m sure”: A Raw Académie Session

RAW Material Company is a Dakar-based centre for art, knowledge and society; […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

IMAGI-NATION NWAR

BIBLIOTHEQUE CHIMURENGA AT BPI/CENTRE POMPIDOU, PARIS (2019-21)

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Between the Lines of an Unpatriotic Presidential Pre-Recorded Address

FOURTH REPUBLIC 19 conducts a post-mortem on not-so-presidential minutes in recorded Nigerian history.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenganyana: Even When My Soup-curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take by Georgia Anne Muldrow (June 2021)

A limited Chimurenganyana edition of Even When My Soup-Curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take by Georgia Anne Muldrow is now available.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

EVEN WHEN MY SOUP-CURLERS SLUR BY GEORGIA ANNE MULDROW – OUT NOW!

A limited Chimurenganyana edition of Even When My Soup-Curlers Slur, I Still Keep the Take by Georgia Anne Muldrow is now available.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

WHO KILLED KABILA II (APRIL 2019)

So, who killed Kabila? The new issue of the Chronic presents this query as the starting point for an in-depth investigation into power, territory and the creative imagination by writers from the Congo and other countries involved in the conflict.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Enemy in Her Imagination: A Fable

Rahel first met the young, 11-year old boy, on December 21, 2006. That was the day after the war in Somalia was declared.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Remember Glissant

Moses März writes of Édouard Glissant, Martinican, poet and compatriot of the more celebrated Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

On the Digital Application of Ancestral Work

African spirituality as practiced digitally was amplified by COVID-19.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

“The Oppressor Remains What He Is”

Why does it seem that the genocide deniers have perked up? What […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Your Own Hand Sold You: Voluntary servitude in the Francafrique

In the CFA franc, the French colonial mission in West Africa found a way to ensure a paternalist and pernicious stranglehold on the economies of a vast region of the continent.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

THIRD CLASS CITY

South Africa thinks that India owes it one for putting Gandhi through revolution school; India thinks South Africa owes it for sending him over to show the natives how it’s done.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Ibadan, Soutin and the Puzzle of Bower’s Tower

The jingle would survive the event, as the poetry of a battle-cry outlives a war, but that eventuality belonged in the future.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Where Terror Lies

The rhetoric of ‘radical’ and ‘fundamentalist’ Islam, of ‘global jihad’ and ‘terror’ is, ironically, historical and recoverable from the irrational.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Nigeria’s Superstar Men Of God

Who needs the God of the bible with his promises of trials and tribulations, crosses and paths of repentance? Yemisi Aribisala listens to the sermons, counts the money, watches the high-flying life of Nigeria’s mega-preachers and wonders.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Nigeria’s Superstar Men Of God

Who needs the God of the bible with his promises of trials and tribulations, crosses and paths of repentance? Yemisi Aribisala listens to the sermons, counts the money, watches the high-flying life of Nigeria’s mega-preachers and wonders.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Invention of Zimbabwe (April 2018)

14 November 2017. News breaks of a coup d’état underway in Zimbabwe. Tanks, armoured vehicles and military personnel are seen patrolling the capital, Harare. The images send shock waves through social media, traditional broadcast news networks and diplomatic channels

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Muzmin (July 2015)

In the minds of many, the Sahara exists as a boundary between the Maghreb and “Black Africa”. History and our lived experience tell a different story. The latest issue of Chimurenga’s pan African gazette, the Chronic,

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

African Cities Reader II: Mobilities & Fixtures

The second installment of the Reader is centered on the theme ‘Mobilities and Fixtures’. In this issue Sean O’Toole interviews architect David Adjaye about African cityscapes, snapshot photography and failed utopias;

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

African Cities Reader III: Land, Property & Value

The third installment of the Reader explores the unholy trinity of land, property and value – the life force of cities everywhere. In this issue António Andrade Tomás reveals the vice and violence that permeate the act of securing land and home in Luanda;

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenga 11 – Conversations with Poets Who Refuse to Speak (July 2007)

This issue is about silence, disappearing oneself as act. Though it’s often one of abdication, could it be defiance, resistance even?

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Yellow Fever, Nko?

Skin bleaching is often described as a manifestation of ‘colo-mentality’. However, argues Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, mimesis here is both an affirmation and a contestation of power.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

They Won’t Go When I Go

A Manifesto/ Meditation on State of Black Archives in America and throughout the Diaspora by Harmony Holiday

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

How Third World Students Liberated the West

In a twist to mainstream tropes of radical student movements of the 1960s, and their impact on the history of political thought and action, Pedro Monaville argues that the terrains of the Third World, and particularly the history of student movements in Congo, are vital to explore if we are to makes sense of how that period informs the present.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Monumental Failures

Dominique Malaquais reports from Cameroon on the active objection of one ‘Combattant’ to the negation of many, cast in stone. Decrying these monumental symbols to the least salubrious of colonial exploits, his rebellion is most fitting in a country that stands on ceremony other than its own.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Steal Back the Treasure

In pirating the head of Queen Idia to use it as a logo for Festac 77 , proposes another dissonant route that challenges the very idea of the work of art as unique object.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Trajectory of a Street Photographer

My quest for an explanation for this omission in my history education made me appreciate the magnitude of the crime… for the struggle against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting. – Santu Mofokeng

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Wrestling With A Warlord

Louis Chude-Sokei narrates a story of Nigeria, of splintered identity, of exile, and of the Biafran War and its godfather – his godfather – General Emeka Odumegwu Ojukwu

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Chimurenga 07: Kaapstad! And Jozi the Night Moses Died (July 2005)

This piece first appeared in Chimurenga 07: Kaapstad! And Jozi the Night […]

Continue Reading

HOW THE WEST WAS LOST

If one thinks about it the whole thing goes back to amaQheya; the cultural proletariat… a proletariat with a cultural history that has taught it to be careful of an African existence…

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Chronic: Who Killed Kabila

On January 16, 2001, in the middle of the day, shots are heard in the Palais de Marbre,the residence of President Laurent-Désiré Kabila.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Colossal KOUROUMA

What could have happened in his head to take literally this type of injunction quite common in lands of Africa? A sense of the word given? The desire to take seriously the hopes of children who usually have little voice? Mystery.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

WHO KILLED KABILA: CAST OF CHARACTERS

The cast list of actors and character who make an appearance in the issue includes everyone from Ché Guevara and psychiatrist, political theorist and Frantz Fanon, to Rashidi Muzele, the assassin who pulled the trigger and many more.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Frantz Fanon’s Uneven Ribs

For me knowledge is very powerful. Any knowledge has claws and teeth. If you don’t see the teeth and the claws then it is useless, then somebody has emasculated it.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

HIKIMA – a letter from Zaria

She eyed me. A thing wet around her eyes, like water from the evening rain. Lateef, she said, an incurable emphasis on both syllables: Lah-teef.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Imagined Waters

Through the poetry of its mariners – the singers of its rivers […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

N’Dombolo: the postulation of the post-Zaïko generation

First and foremost, an artistic secretion (the magical respiration of an entire generation of young Congolese), the Wenge generation’s most emblematic creation, a form of humour and a playful ape-like mimicry. The outpouring of Kinshasa, city of dreams, city of turmoil.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Pharaoh’s New Clothes

Its location, vocation, and publication intended to speak to a politicised Third World imaginary.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial