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Search results for "Black Chalk Co"

Chimurenganyana: La Discotheque De Sarah Maldoror (March 2023)

decomposed, an-arranged and reproduced by Ntone Edjabe

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Chimurenganyana: Home Is Where The Music Is by Uhuru Phalafala (September 2021)

“Home is where the music is” is drawn from Keorapetse Kgositsile’s poem […]

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IMAGI-NATION NWAR (APRIL 2021)

Genealogies of the black radical imagination in the francophone world

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Chimurenganyana: Becoming Kwame Ture by Amandla Thomas-Johnson (Oct 2020)

Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) was viewed by many during the civil rights […]

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FESTAC 77 BOOK (Oct 2019)

Early in 1977, thousands of artists, writers, musicians, activists and scholars from Africa and the black diaspora assembled in Lagos for FESTAC ’77, the 2nd World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. With a radically ambitious agenda underwritten by Nigeria’s newfound oil wealth, FESTAC ’77 would unfold as a complex, glorious and excessive culmination of a half-century of transatlantic and pan-Africanist cultural-political gatherings.

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Hypnotic Brass Ensemble – LIVE at Centre for The Book, Cape Town

Listen to Hypnotic Brass Ensemble, LIVE at The Centre for the Book, Cape […]

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Dakar

“Angazi, but I’m sure” is a common South African phrase. In English it means: “I don’t know, but I am sure”. It is a deliberately self-contradictory phrase that is usually spoken in prelude to a reply –

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New York

At Performa 2015, the Chimurenga Library took the form of a library-of-people, bringing together a broad spectrum of NYC.

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London

For the first UK presentation, Chimurenga infiltrated The Showroom’s building in the form of The Chimurenga Library, inserting ourselves into the existing frameworks,

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San Francisco

Presented as part of the exhibition Public Intimacy, Chimurenga Library offered a simple system that allowed visitors to connect various items in the stacks at the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library

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Comics & Lower Frequencies

Africa has a long history of comic production that span multiple forms and formats, from popular photocomics such as African Film, produced by Drum in Nigeria,

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Panafest

From January 15 to February 12 1977, thousands of artists, writers, musicians, activists and scholars from Africa and the black diaspora descended on Lagos,

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Y MAGAZINE (THE FIRST 5 ISSUES)

 Born in 1998 out of a joint partnership between Studentwise, publishers of […]

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THE UN-COLLECTED WRITINGS OF GREG TATE

Greg Tate has spent the last two decades formulating a critical language […]

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THE CRICKET – BLACK MUSIC IN EVOLUTION

The editorial in the first issue of The Cricket spells out the […]

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STAFFRIDER

Borrowing its name and image from township slang for black youth who […]

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SAVACOU

In 1974 Barbadian poet Kamau Braithwaite summarized the overlapping realities, the cross-cultural […]

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MOLOTOV COCKTAIL

First published in 2007 Molotov Cocktail initially appeared to be a contradictory […]

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MFUMU’ETO

In the 1990s the self-declared “bedeaste and high priest of painting mystico-African […]

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LAMALIF

Published in Morocco in 1966, Lamalif took its title from two Arabic […]

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L’AUTRE AFRIQUE

As its name suggests, The Other Africa aims to provide a different […]

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HEI VOETSEK!

“This magazine is just to say we’re out there and we don’t […]

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HAMBONE

For the last three decades, Nathaniel Mackey, an African-American writer on the […]

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GLENDORA REVIEW

Glendora Review was conceived in an atmosphere of intellectual crisis following the […]

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FRANK TALK

Founded in 1984 in South Africa, Frank Talk is a political journal […]

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ECRANS D’AFRIQUE

Founded by African filmmakers in Burkina Faso in 1992, during a period […]

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Civil Lines

Launched in 1994 by publisher Ravi Dayal, Civil Lines quickly became the home of […]

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CHIEF PRIEST SAY

In an essay titled “Roforofo Fight,” oppositional politics expert Yomi Durotoye describes […]

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Black Images

Founded in 1972 by elusive, visionary editor, Jamaican-born Rudolph “Rudy” Murray – and his literary alter ego, M. Lacovia. Murray, Black Images:

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Amkenah

Founded in 1999, Amkenah magazine is published by writer Alaa Khaled and […]

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AFRICAN FILM

Published by Drum in Nigeria and later also Kenya and Ghana in the early 60s, African Film was just one of the many photo comics or “look books” that flooded

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The Chronic: Who Killed Kabila II

On January 16, 2001, in the middle of the day, shots are heard in the Palais de Marbre,the residence of President Laurent-Désiré Kabila. The road bordering the presidential residence, usually closed from 6pm by a simple guarded barrier is blocked by tanks. 

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Who Killed Kabila I

The Chimurenga Library is a research platform that seeks to re-imagine the library as a laboratory for extended curiosity, new adventures, critical thinking, daydreaming, socio-political involvement, partying and random perusal.

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African Cities Reader III: Land, Property & Value

The third installment of the Reader explores the unholy trinity of land, property and value – the life force of cities everywhere. In this issue António Andrade Tomás reveals the vice and violence that permeate the act of securing land and home in Luanda;

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The Chronic (August 2013)

Writers in the broadsheet include Jon Soske, Paula Akugizibwe, Yves Mintoogue, Adewale Maja-Pearce, Parsalelo Kantai, Fred Moten & Stefano Harney, Cedric Vincent, Deji Toye, Derin Ajao, Tony Mochama, Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah,Agri Ismaïl, Lindokuhle Nkosi, Bongani Kona, Stacy Hardy, Emmanuel Induma, Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, Lolade Ayewudi, Simon Kuper and many others.

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Chimurenganyana: Variations of the Beautiful in the World of Congolese Sounds by Achille Mbembe (2009)

Achille Mbembe is a research professor in history and politics at the […]

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Chimurenga 14 – Everyone Has Their Indian (April 2009)

This issue features words and images on the Third World project and links, real and imagined, between Africa and South Asia.

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Chimurenga 12/13 – Dr Satan’s Echo Chamber (Double-Issue March 2008)

A double-take on sci-fi and speculative writing from the African world, collectively titled “Dr. Satan’s Echo Chamber” after a dub mix by King Tubby.

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Chimurenga 11 – Conversations with Poets Who Refuse to Speak (July 2007)

This issue is about silence, disappearing oneself as act. Though it’s often one of abdication, could it be defiance, resistance even?

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Chimurenga 9 – Conversations in Luanda, and Other Graphic Stories (June 2006)

For this one we trawled the globe for ink artists/wordists to give us their perspectives on love, life and the multiverse.

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CHIMURENGA SESSION: FELASOPHY

On 2 December 2005, Chimurenga hosted Felasophy for the launch of Chimurenga 08: We’re All Nigerian, at Shivava Cafe in Newtown, Johannesburg.

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Chimurenga 5 – Head/Body(&Tools)/Corpses (April 2004)

An issue inspired by the life and work of Bessie Head. Including previously unpublished works by Head, and featuring new writing and art by Jean Claude Fignole,

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Chimurenga 4 – Black Gays & Mugabes (May 2003)

On desire and its discontents. Featuring a new adaptation of Yambo Ouologuem erotica, and new works by Kopano Ratele, Kalamu ya Salaam, Gael Reagon, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Zackie Achmat,

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Chimurenga 2 – Dis-Covering Home [run nigga run] (July 2002)

Home, lost and found. Takes by Mahmood Mamdani, Julian Jonker, Henk Rossouw, Binyavanga Wainaina, Gaston Zossou, Haile Gerima,

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