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Search results for " Fare Ala"

THIRD TRANSITION

<p>Shoks Mzolo and Bongani Kona trace the path of South Africas transformation from a criminal apartheid state to a criminal neoliberal state</p>
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Between the Lines of an Unpatriotic Presidential Pre-Recorded Address

<p>FOURTH REPUBLIC 19 conducts a post-mortem on not-so-presidential minutes in recorded Nigerian history.</p>
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Ibadan, Soutin and the Puzzle of Bowers Tower

<p>The jingle would survive the event, as the poetry of a battle-cry outlives a war, but that eventuality belonged in the future.</p>
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Nigeria&#8217;s Superstar Men Of God

<p>Who needs the God of the bible with his promises of trials and tribulations, crosses and paths of repentance? Yemisi Aribisala listens to the sermons, counts the money, watches the high-flying life of Nigerias mega-preachers and wonders.</p>
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Nigeria&#8217;s Superstar Men Of God

<p>Who needs the God of the bible with his promises of trials and tribulations, crosses and paths of repentance? Yemisi Aribisala listens to the sermons, counts the money, watches the high-flying life of Nigerias mega-preachers and wonders.</p>
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African Cities Reader I: Pan-African Practices

<p>In the launch issue Rustum Kozain muses over the cultural and alternative relations built, negotiations and dealings made as a resident of Cape Town (South Africa); Jean-Christophe Lanquetins SAPE Project is captured in a pictorial narrative; </p>
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Chimurenga 8 &#8211; Were All Nigerian! (December 2005)

<p>An exploration of a love-hate, admiration-envy, awe-disappointment relationship with Nigerianess; Features the last interview</p>
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Monumental Failures

<p>Dominique Malaquais reports from Cameroon on the active objection of one &#8216;Combattant&#8217; to the negation of many, cast in stone. Decrying these monumental symbols to the least salubrious of colonial exploits, his rebellion is most fitting in a country that stands on ceremony other than its own.</p>
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Remembering Biafra

<p>In 1968, Nigeria&#8217;s finance minister, agricultural produce mogul Obafemi Awolowo declared: &#8220;Starvation is a legitimate weapon of war, and we have every intention to use it against the rebels.&#8221;</p>
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Frantz Fanon&#8217;s Uneven Ribs

<p>For me knowledge is very powerful. Any knowledge has claws and teeth. If you don&#8217;t see the teeth and the claws then it is useless, then somebody has emasculated it. </p>
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Imagined Waters

<p>Through the poetry of its mariners the singers of its rivers [&hellip;]</p>
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THINGS THAT GO IN AND OUT OF THE BODY

<p>How can we think about bodies and circulation without deferring to the [&hellip;]</p>
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OF TOTEMS, HISTORY AND POLITICS

<p>In Shona cosmology, people are understood to be more than the sum [&hellip;]</p>
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THE BLACK BOMB

<p>Mamadou Diallo channels Carlos Moore, the exiled Cuban who traversed most of [&hellip;]</p>
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PORTRAIT OF MYSELF AS MY FATHER

<p>A CONVERSATION WITH NORA CHIPAUMIRE Born&nbsp;in Mutare, Zimbabwe, and based in New [&hellip;]</p>
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NATIONAL HEROES ACRE II &#038; III

<p>National Heroes Acre II Photographs by Jekesai Njikizanava National Heroes Acre II [&hellip;]</p>
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A BRIEF HISTORY OF CHIMURENGA AS A COMMUNAL LABORATORY

<p>by Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga Since the 1970s, Zimbabweans have used the term [&hellip;]</p>
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Down the footpath

<p>Emmanuel Iduma in conversation with photographer Akinbode Akinbiyi On a number of [&hellip;]</p>
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Meeting Marti, Neruda and Langa in the streets

<p>Amabhulu amnyama andenzel i-worry, Amabhulu amanyama andenzel i-worry andenzel indlala (White-blacks are [&hellip;]</p>
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Some African Cultural Concepts By Steve Biko

<p>&nbsp; This is a paper given by Steve at a conference called [&hellip;]</p>
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Dagga

<p>Rustum Kozain muses over the cultural and alternative relations built, negotiations and dealings made as a resident of Cape Town.</p>
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Calabar Winch

<p>By Akin Adesokan I When the goddess of happy accidents stumbles on [&hellip;]</p>
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Fufu Pot: A Truth Hard to Swallow

<p>In search of another interesting meal from the myriad on offer in [&hellip;]</p>
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Time to Bleed

<p>An extended conversation between Aryan Kaganof and Walter Mignolo &nbsp; What I [&hellip;]</p>
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The Making of Mannenberg

<p>By John Edwin Mason On a winters day in 1974, a group [&hellip;]</p>
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The Upper Room

<p>By Florence Madenga 4pm: Opening Prayer We are waiting for Apostle Debbie [&hellip;]</p>
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Focusing the Fashionable Mind

<p>The parochialism and pretence emanating from some South African human rights organisations [&hellip;]</p>
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Sexing Africa, Again

<p>Dominique Malaquais spins together Lil Kim, burkas, Muslim women, Somali Mata-Haris and [&hellip;]</p>
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Dansons Donc le Zouglou

<p>By Henri-Michel Yere Déscolarisé In 1980s Côte dIvoire, exclusion from the schooling [&hellip;]</p>
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Lagos, Lagos

<p>By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Chidera&#8217;s taxi crawled over Third Mainland Bridge, towards [&hellip;]</p>
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Mining the Biennale

<p>In late 2012, two contemporary art exhibitions opened in the same country, [&hellip;]</p>
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It Can Only Go Up From Here

<p>By Nisreen Kaj &nbsp; For a long time, I was sure Lebanon was [&hellip;]</p>
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Dispossessed Vigils

<p>Mourning and Regeneration in Inner-City Johannesburg[1] By&nbsp;Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon Only the conscious horror [&hellip;]</p>
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City Building in Post-Conflict, Post-Socialist Luanda

<p>Burying the Past with Phantasmagorias of the Future &nbsp; By Anne Pitcher [&hellip;]</p>
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The Scandal

<p>by Suren Pillay During the past 10 years I have seen reports [&hellip;]</p>
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Re-Membering the Name of God

<p>Wendell Hassan Marsh maps the trajectories of Islam as it evolved in [&hellip;]</p>
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All That is Solid Melts into PR

<p>Mark Fisher, author of the book Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? [&hellip;]</p>
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The Undeveloped Intellectual in Zombie-land

<p>by Ibrahim Farghali. This is Rakhas second novel after his début, The Book [&hellip;]</p>
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Shooting From Point Blank Range

<p>Moses Serubiri turns on the television and watches the news unfold, in [&hellip;]</p>
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New Oil Old Lamps

<p>The old Arab adage that Cairo writes, Beirut publishes and Baghdad reads [&hellip;]</p>
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The Internet is Afropolitan

<p>Achille Mbembe discusses the history and horizon of digital communication and identity [&hellip;]</p>
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Situation is Critical

<p>Jeremy Weate moves from text to context in search of the current [&hellip;]</p>
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Poets Are Hurting: Lesego Rampolokeng in Conversation with Mafika Gwala

<p>Mafika Gwala emerged as a significant writer in the 1970s during his [&hellip;]</p>
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Palestine Journey

<p>In February 2005, Ishtiyaq Shukris novel The Silent Minaret, won the first European [&hellip;]</p>
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Fifty Years Of African Decolonisation

<p>by Achille Mbembe (translated by Karen Press) &nbsp; Here we are in 2010, fifty [&hellip;]</p>
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Nation Is A Skin Stretched Over The Bones Of The State

<p>Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ [&hellip;]</p>
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Im Not An African Writer, Damn You!

<p>by Akin Adesokan One is an African writer, or rather one becomes [&hellip;]</p>
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Number 11

<p>Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño muses on writing, borders, Latin American literature and the [&hellip;]</p>
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Birthing the American

<p>Yemisi Aribisala explores, with mixed emotions, the enduring opportunism of a Nigerian elite that ensures that generations of children claim US birthright. Despite the assumed status that goes with being born abroad, the American dream, she argues, is in fact only a Nigerian backup plan.</p>
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Fuzzy Goos Guide (to the Earth)

<p>Playing with words, the original Black Heretic Insider Dambudzo Marechera writes his own rulebook [&hellip;]</p>
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