Tag Archives | Stacy Hardy

Penpoints, Gunpoints, and Dreams:

From the earnest hustle of our elders in writing during the 1960s to the contemporary dreams of ubiquitous hustler writers, Billy Kahora* wonders about the place of creative writing programmes. Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s memoir, Birth of a Dream Weaver, describes a unique moment at the 1962 Makerere Conference for Literature that feels straight out of […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Agronomist

Stacy Hardy follows the path of JJ Machobane, the social visionary, writer and agronomist from Lesotho, who challenged orthodox colonial thinking about land and land use.   “An employed man is like a well-fed and chained up dog.” This brief sentence, emblazoned on the back cover of Drive out Hunger, a slim monograph on Lesotho writer […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Survivor’s Guide to Smelling Naais

In the pre-Apocalypse, Zayaan Khan nurses the Apartheid hangover that carved up sensibilities, lives deep in the crevice of being and after more than 20 years still sticks to the roof of the mouth. To empty out the bitter taste, she sucks on fennel flowers and takes her sweetness where she can get it – […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Second German Chronic is Here

The second German-language edition of the Chronic takes up the theme of new cartographies. The 32-page publication features translations of maps and selected writings from previous editions of the English Chronic produced in 2014 and 2015.   Contributors include Binyavanga Wainaina, Yemisi Aribisala, Billy Kahora, Jesse Weaver Shipley, Wendell Marsh, Agri Ismail, Moses März, Elnathan John, Stacy Hardy, Sarah Jappie and […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

A Brief History of Student Protests

By Stacy Hardy “Bile bums my inside!/ I feel like vomiting! For all our young men/ Were finished in the forest/Their manhood was finished/ In the classrooms/ Their testicles/ Were smashed/ With large books!” First published 50 years ago, these incendiary lines in Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino capture the ongoing antagonism towards the university […]

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }