Tag Archives | Sean O’Toole

Between Worldliness and Exile Homelessness and Cosmopolitanism

With essays by Akin Adesokan, Imraan Coovadia and Ngugi wa Thiong’o bound together,  Sean O’Toole examines idiosyncratic writing styles and “the intellectual nature of postcoloniality”. A young boy grows up amid the “unplanned spectacle of the expressive everyday”, a kind of ecstatic fluorescence of culture – music, films, art – that is snuffed out by a military coup. What to do? Like […]

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Why music is better than photography

Why music is better than photography: An argument in two parts by Sean O’Toole [1] “Hey boy, stand there. Between Sonny and Miriam. Yes… no, more to your left. Your left, boy… that side. What’s wrong with you, are you stupid like?” The young man in the pencil tie shuffles into place. Slowly, very slowly, something begins to cohere. A photo, […]

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The Hyphenated African

Teju Cole takes a break from Twitter to speak to Sean O’Toole at the Open Book Festival in Cape Town, who struggles to find a compact with an author of “complicated attitudes and responses”.     “Eight press interviews in Cape Town so far,” tweeted author Teju Cole on 10 September 2013, a day after […]

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Three Men, A Fence & A Dead Body

Sean O’Toole travels to the northern reaches of Limpopo where South Africa meets Zimbabwe. The border fence, once dubbed the snake of fire because of its lethal charge, is no longer live but remains a living monument that delineates ‘here from there’.   The fence #1 You forget the heat. I am back in Musina […]

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Cover Story

He’s been described as the “founding father of African literature”, an author “who played key role in developing African literature”;  a “towering man of letters” who “helped to revive African literature”…  but these accolades do little justice to Chinua Achebe’s literary legacy. One of the greatest writers/storytellers in the English language, Achebe was equally adept […]

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