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THE CHRONIC, APRIL 2017

Food security – an industry fuelled by massive material resources and expert knowledge aimed ostensibly at managing the world’s food crisis – has shaped how we think about food. Driven by development discourse, and fed by a global food regime wherein the very systems meant to feed us, starve us, its focus, especially when it comes to Africa, is large […]

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“Angazi, but I’m sure”: A Raw Académie Session

RAW Material Company is a Dakar-based centre for art, knowledge and society; concerned with curatorial practice, artistic education, residencies, knowledge production, and archiving of theory and criticism on art. From 3rd April to 26th May 2017, Chimurenga will be partnering with RAW to host the RAW Académie: a tuition-free residential experiential study programme for artistic and curatorial […]

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The Second German Chronic is Here

The second German-language edition of the Chronic takes up the theme of new cartographies. The 32-page publication features translations of maps and selected writings from previous editions of the English Chronic produced in 2014 and 2015.   Contributors include Binyavanga Wainaina, Yemisi Aribisala, Billy Kahora, Jesse Weaver Shipley, Wendell Marsh, Agri Ismail, Moses März, Elnathan John, Stacy Hardy, Sarah Jappie and […]

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PASS landing at the CiC Library, Cairo

From 17 -19 February 2017, the Pan African Space Station landed in the library of Contemporary Image Collective (CiC) in downtown Cairo. PASS in Cairo featured live readings, performances and conversations with Chimurenga’s collaborators in the city, including Hassan Khan, Amanda KM, Mohamed Abdelkarim, Amado Alfadni, Adham Hafez, Shatha El Deghady, Magdy El Shafee, Amira Hanafi and many more. […]

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Reform and Revolution: The Destruction of the University

In the fall of 2015, universities across South Africa were engulfed by fires ignited by students’ discontent with the racial discrimination and colonialism that still defines the country’s institutes of higher education. The protests broadcast on televisions around the world were neither without precedent nor without parallel. The University in Africa, and indeed South Africa, […]

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